Tag: 浙江宁波龙凤网


first_imgNew Delhi: Violation of the odd-even road rationing rule, scheduled to kick in from November 4 in the city, will invite a fine of Rs 20,000 as per the amended Motor Vehicles Act, officials said on Thursday. The odd-even scheme involves plying of vehicles on alternate days as per the last odd or even digit of their registration numbers. Earlier, when the odd-even scheme was imposed by the Delhi government in January and April 2016, the violation was punishable with a fine of Rs 2,000. Also Read – Odd-Even: CM seeks transport dept’s views on exemption to women, two wheelers, CNG vehicles However, a final decision on the size of penalty has not been made since the notification of compoundable offences under the amended MV Act is yet to be notified by the Delhi government, an official said. “The government is authorised to reduce the amount of fine which it may or may not do, ” said the official. Under Section 115 of the MV Act, violation of the odd-even rule is a traffic offence for which the fine amount has been raised from Rs 2,000 to Rs 20,000 after amendment which came into effect from September 1 this year. Also Read – More good air days in Delhi due to Centre’s steps: Javadekar Section 115 of the MV Act gives the state government the power to restrict the use of vehicles and that is how the Delhi government rolls out the odd-even scheme. Now, the revised penalty for violation under this section is mentioned in Clause 194 of the Act. Earlier, the Act stated that the penalty was a minimum of Rs 2,000, which has now been increased to Rs 20,000. Recently, Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal announced implementation of the odd-even scheme in Delhi as part of the seven point action plan from November 4-15, to combat high levels of air pollution in winters. He had also acknowledged that the high penalty amount has improved indisciplined road traffic in the city, but had added that his government will consider reducing fines under its jurisdiction.last_img read more


first_imgNew Delhi: To reduce the growing backlog of cases, the Supreme Court has for the first time since its inception provided for sitting of a single-judge bench to hear appeals of bail and anticipatory bail in cases related to offences entailing jail term up to seven years. As per the rules which have been amended, the single judge would also hear transfer petitions. The Supreme Court judges till now normally used to sit in the combination of two. Court number 1, which is presided over by the Chief Justice of India, also sits in the combination of three-judges. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra SinghA gazette notification was issued on September 17, through which the Supreme Court has amended its Supreme Court Rules, 2013. It said the following categories of matters may be “heard and disposed of finally by a judge sitting singly nominated by the Chief Justice: Special Leave Petition arising out of grant, dismissal or rejection of bail application or anticipatory bail application in the matters filed against the order passed under section 437, section 438 or section 439 of CrPC involving offences punishable with sentence up to seven years imprisonment”. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroadThe amended rules also stated that the application for transfer of cases under section 406 of CrPC and application of an urgent nature for transfer of cases under section 25 of Code of Civil Procedure (CPC) will also be heard by a single judge bench. The notification further said that Chief Justice of India (CJI) may notify any other category of cases time to time, for final disposal by a single judge bench. It said that single judge will be nominated by the Chief Justice for disposal of said categories of cases. Earlier, as per Supreme Court Rules, 2013 and older rules, the CJI had the power to appoint one or more judges to hear all matters of an urgent nature during summer vacation or winter holidays. The Supreme Court website said, “The original Constitution of 1950 envisaged a Supreme Court with a Chief Justice and 7 puisne Judges – leaving it to Parliament to increase this number”. It said, “In the early years, all the Judges of the Supreme Court sat together to hear the cases presented before them. As the work of the Court increased and arrears of cases began to cumulate, Parliament increased the number of Judges from 8 in 1950 to 11 in 1956, 14 in 1960, 18 in 1978 and 26 in 1986. “As the number of the Judges has increased, they sit in smaller Benches of two and three – coming together in larger Benches of 5 and more only when required to do so or to settle a difference of opinion or controversy,” the apex court website said.last_img read more

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